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Paper Heart's Charlyne Yi Talks Love and Dating

Paper Heart's Charlyne Yi Talks Love and Dating

In Paper Heart, opening in theaters this Friday, Charlyne Yi plays a documentary filmmaker intent on finding out what people, young and old, feel about love. During her travels and interviews, she falls in love with geek heartthrob Michael Cera. Not only did Charlyne star in Paper Heart with Cera (and Seth Rogen and funny man Demetri Martin), she won the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award for co-penning the film’s script! We asked the wisecracking Yi her thoughts on modern love and dating. . .

TS: Do you think that cynics are the true romantics?
CY: Before we begin, I'd like to clarify I am no Love Guru (Mike Meyers). I don't think anyone can really define love. It's one wild, wild beast. And I don't think anyone is wrong or right. For this, I'm just gonna share my personal op. That's short for opinion. I don't believe anyone is truly "cynical." I think we all have doubts and question love, but I don't think there's anything wrong with that. It's normal and healthy. To find out what else Charlyne thinks about dating and love, read more.

Perhaps sometimes people are wary of love because they're trying to be smart, don't understand love, or of the fear of getting hurt again, or even hurting the other person . . . after all love is such a fragile thing. It would be awful to say you loved someone when you were unsure. When you're in a relationship, you're responsible for each other's feelings. And that is super scary. And I think there are no real cynics. Because there is a flicker of hope within them, where they wish they had somebody. I think everybody wants to mean something to somebody, even if they are "cynical" or "skeptical."

TS: How would you describe dating for the so-called Generation Y set? What makes dating different for them compared to previous generations?
CY: I'm not sure. I've only lived in this generation. But I've noticed my parent's generation got married really early on, around 19-early twenties. Most people I hang out with don't get married until much much older like mid 30s.

TS: What’s the best thing about dating?
CY: When you've reached the point in the relationship when you don't have to try anymore. And you both can spend time doing the most boring thing, and yet have fun.

TS: . . . the worst thing?
CY: Not being able to read the other person's mind. Uncertainty about how the other person is feeling.

TS: What is the best dating advice you ever got?
CY: I made up my own advice. I figure if I'm my gross weird self in the very beginning, instead of trying to show my best side and impress them, and later revealing who I really am, I would just be me. And this sounds dumb, but if I need to fart, I'm gonna do it. And maybe if they accept all of me early on, they've passed the test. And actually like me.

TS: What’s the biggest “don’t” on a date?
CY: Don't: Punch me in the face.

TS: Describe the worst date you were ever on.
CY: It was sad, the guy started crying at dinner about his ex-girlfriend. I felt bad.

TS: What are the elements of a good date?
CY: I don't think it matters where you are. It could be the dullest of all places or most dreadful. It just matters if the person you're out with and you are having fun and can actually carry an enjoyable conversation. And they can make me laugh.

TS: Should established couples still go on dates, or is this strictly the penance singles must suffer?
CY: I don't understand this question. Maybe because I don't know what penance means.

TS: Is dating obsolete?
CY: Again, don't understand this question. Seriously.

TS: Thanks, Charlyne! We can't wait to see this cute movie. . .

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