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Check This: Coming Out of The Political Closet


This week's Modern Love column in the New York Times is called, I Married a Republican: There, I Said It. It's a tale of a war protesting, straight-ticket voting Democrat who falls for a Republican. She decides to accept him because he says, "I vote for the best candidate. I read everything I can. I listen to them speak. And I vote for the person who can do the best job.”

Despite this, her husband's political beliefs plague her. She says, "love can sidetrack a person. Still, it did not feel good when I told myself: I love a Republican. It felt, in fact, like I had betrayed someone. Or many people." She is tortured by her husband's difference as friends make comments, and she becomes increasingly impatient with his point of view.

I agree, it's distinctly and wildly uncomfortable to be in a big group of people who assume everyone agrees with them — especially when they launch into a tirade or joke directed right at the heart of your beliefs — because how on earth could anyone think differently? I'm sure they think they don't even know any... of those people. To find out how this applies to any party or belief, read more. Being a political minority is the last publicly accepted form of bigotry. We would shun anyone who would say something negative about a physical trait, and relegate some jokes and thoughts to the realm of "not politically correct." Why not this? Why is political bashing accepted?

I'm glad this topic is being discussed — though I'm personally not so thrilled that the "happy ending" was that her Republican husband "saw the light" and planted an Obama sign in the front yard, making it seem like, phew! She could finally love him again.

Have you ever been in a relationship where you felt compelled to hide your partner's beliefs? Do you feel like you have to hide your political leanings? Have you ever been discriminated against because of your party?

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